FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (1 November 1995) The Agreement aims to achieve this objective by establishing a framework for cooperation in the conservation and management of these resources. It promotes the order of the oceans through the effective management and conservation of the resources of the high seas, including by establishing detailed minimum international standards for the conservation and management of straddling fish stocks and highly migratory fish stocks; ensure that measures for the conservation and management of these stocks in areas of national jurisdiction and adjacent high seas are compatible and consistent; ensure the effective implementation of these measures on the high seas; and recognition of the specific conservation, management, development and participation needs of developing countries for the two types of stocks mentioned above. In negotiating the SEAFO Convention, States relied not only on the 1995 United Nations Fish Stocks Convention, but also on a number of other agreements, including the Conventions establishing the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), ICCAT, the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) and the Northeast Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC). Some States participating in the negotiations are members of these RFMOs. Therefore, the draft SEAFO Convention could easily be approved if it were derived from the existing conventions. The implementation of the 1995 United Nations Convention on Fish Stocks poses major challenges for both States and subregional or regional fisheries management organizations or arrangements (RFMOs). The implementation of the Agreement is underpinned by the need for concerted international cooperation. States are required to cooperate, either directly or through regional fisheries management organizations, to ensure the effective conservation and management of straddling fish stocks and highly migratory fish stocks. Highly migratory fish are a term that has its origin in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. It refers to fish species that undertake ocean migrations and also have a wide geographical distribution, and generally refers to tuna and species resembling tuna, shark, marlin and swordfish. Straddling fish stocks are particularly vulnerable to overfishing due to inefficient management regimes and non-compliance by fisheries interests. The 1995 United Nations Fish Stocks Convention gave rise to two new RFMOs: one dealing with the management of straddling fish stocks and the other with highly migratory fish stocks. The Government of Namibia has established an interim secretariat to facilitate the implementation of the Convention.

It will carry out this task until the entry into force of the Convention and the full implementation of the administrative arrangements. The Interim Secretariat will conclude provisional arrangements for the authorization and notification of fishing vessels, the needs of vessels, as well as scientific monitoring and the collection of information in support of stock assessment. The main aspects of the SEAFO Convention are the establishment of a Commission, a Secretariat and a Compliance and Scientific Committee, the application of the precautionary approach, the obligations of the Party3, the obligations of the flag State, the obligations of the port State and the measures taken by a port State, monitoring, inspection, compliance and enforcement, decision-making, cooperation with other organisations, compatibility of conservation and the union of the European Union. management measures; Fishing opportunities, recognition of the special needs of developing countries in the region, non-Parties to the Convention, implementation and final provisions. The 1995 UN Fish Stocks Convention places regional fisheries management organisations in a central and central position with regard to its implementation; they are the main mechanism through which States should work together to improve the conservation and management of resources. Some REGIONAL MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATIONS whose mandate covers the conservation and management of straddling fish stocks and highly migratory fish stocks have reviewed or are in the process of revising certain provisions of their respective conventions to ensure that they are in conformity with the Agreement. In some cases, substantial amendments to the Conventions have been proposed or introduced. Despite these developments, however, RFMOs address the practical aspects of implementing the agreement, e.B. with the application of the precautionary approach in fisheries management, the implementation of ecosystem management and transparency.

With a view to the entry into force of the Agreement, the last session of the Western and Central Pacific Tuna Conference agreed to establish a preparatory conference, which began its work in April 2002. The objective was to establish the organizational and financial framework for the new Commission and its subsidiary bodies in order to ensure that the Commission could begin its activities effectively and with a minimum of delay. The conference also started with the collection and analysis of data on the state of fish stocks and recommended conservation and management measures if necessary. The next pre-hearing conference is scheduled for December 2004. The United Nations Fish Stocks Convention aims to ensure the long-term conservation and sustainable use of straddling and highly migratory fish stocks under the Convention on the Law of the Sea. Overlapping stocks are fish stocks that pass through more than one exclusive economic zone or are in more than one exclusive economic zone. The agreement was adopted in 1995 and entered into force in 2001. [1] Even before the entry into force of the 1995 United Nations Fish Stocks Convention, States had participated, individually and in cooperation with each other, in a number of initiatives to promote the implementation of the Convention. Since 1995, some States have adopted new laws and/or regulations to ensure that they are able to exercise greater control by flag States over the activities of their flagships when operating on the high seas. .